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>Wood Frog

| Wildlife Viewing, wood frog

> Wood Frog found in the Columbia Wetlands – Photo by Larry Halverson Mike Kerr, from Canmore, writes about the Wood Frog in his book The Canadian Rockies Guide to Wildlife Watching “The Wood Frog is the most terrestrial of frogs, so it may show up some distance from water. It is a truly Canadian frog, if [&hellip

>Columbia Spotted Frogs

| Amphibians, Breeding, Call, Frog Monitoring

>  April 19th Columbia Spotted Frogs  Photo by Larry Halverson Columbia Spotted Frogs breed early in the spring – often before the pond ice has disappeared. The breeding period is quite short and last 2 weeks at the most. The males station themselves along the shore and call with their heads just out of water. [&hellip

>Osprey are Back

| Migration Corridors, Osprey, Telemetry

> Osprey are circumpolar in distribution however the Columbia Valley is a major population centre for Osprey     Photo by Larry Halverson Ellen Zimmerman reported the return of the first Osprey – April 6th on a nest just south of Golden along the highway. Osprey in the Columbia Valley can travel over 6,000 km on [&hellip

>Western Painted Turtle

| Basking, Reptiles, Species at Risk, Thermo Regulating

> Western Painted Turtles basking, April 13, 2011.  Photo by Larry Halverson Western Painted Turtles are blue-listed in BC, meaning they are vulnerable to further decline due to habitat loss and destruction. “Turtles are cold-blooded and require the sun’s energy to regulate body temperature,” says Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program, biologist Ross Clarke. Basking out [&hellip

>River Otters

Blueheron | Columbia Wetlands Wildlife Management Area, feeding, Nothern Pikeminnow, River Otters

> River Otters in the Wilmer Marsh, Columbia Wetlands Wildlife Management Area. Video by Pat Morrow Like most predators River Otters prey upon the species that are the most readily accessible. Fish are their favoured food and studies have shown that slow swimming fish like the Northern Pikeminnow (Squawfish) in Pat’s video are preyed upon more often than [&hellip

>River Otters

| Columbia Wetlands Wildlife Management Area, feeding, Nothern Pikeminnow, River Otters

> River Otters in the Wilmer Marsh, Columbia Wetlands Wildlife Management Area. Video by Pat Morrow Like most predators River Otters prey upon the species that are the most readily accessible. Fish are their favoured food and studies have shown that slow swimming fish like the Northern Pikeminnow (Squawfish) in Pat’s video are preyed upon more often than [&hellip

>Wilmer Marsh Clean Up

| Home

> Spyder Hoe  – Photo by Larry Halverson The Wilmer Marsh, prior to becoming part of The Columbia National Wildlife Area was historically used as an unofficial dump site. Over the years a significant amount of garbage (including home heating oil tanks, car bodies, tires, paint cans and general household waste) accumulated in the marsh [&hellip

>The Beavers

| Beavers, kits, lodge, winter

> A friend  Brian Keating took this amazing video of beavers in his Calgary backyard.  “Brian heads up the Conservation Outreach Department at the Calgary Zoo, where he’s responsible for a variety of local and international conservation projects. He also started the Zoo’s nature-based travel program some 20 years ago, visiting many of the best wildlife watching locations on [&hellip

>Canada Goose Display

| Canada Goose, territorial display

> Canada geese near the Athalmer bridge. Photo by Larry Halverson It is a good time of year to spend an evening along the Columbia River.  As there is lots of Canada Goose activity. The goose in this video clip was defending its mate. Using the head forward display – the goose extends its neck, holds [&hellip

>Fish Need to Move

| Ecological Restoration, fish, Migration Corridors, Streams

> Shuswap Creek before Photo by Larry Halverson Shuswap Creek after culverts removed Photo by Larry Halverson “Fish travel along waterways to find food, mates, good spawning gravel and safe places for their young to grow. A poorly functioning culvert can stop fish from reaching key parts of their habitat, resulting in lower numbers of [&hellip

Columbia Wetlands Stewardship Partners