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Windermere Christmas Bird Count

Blueheron | monitoring. birds

American Robin one of the 52 species recorded. Photo by Larry Halverson Seventy four people counted 3,927 individual birds during the 34th annual Lake Windermere District Christmas Bird Count. The number of birds is up by 47% from last year. Some of the increase can be attributed to high number Bohemian Waxwings and Common Redpolls. [&hellip

Butterfly Weed

| Aquatic Plants, Butterfly, Invasive

> Showy Milkweed (Asclepias speciosa)  Photo by Larry Halverson This pretty milkweed is not listed in BC but considered invasive. Unlike other milkweeds it can found in wetlands.   This one was found blooming on August 9th by the wetlands near Athalmer.  Showy milkweed is toxic. It possesses moderate concentrations of cardenolides, and can poison or [&hellip

Columbia Salmon Festival

Blueheron | education, Festival, fish, kokanee salmon, Salmon

The first annual Columbia Salmon Festival will be taking place September 28-October 1, 2011 in the Columbia Valley. This inaugural Festival is being hosted by the Shuswap Indian Band and Akisqnuk First Nation and proudly supported by the Canadian Columbia Inter-Tribal Fisheries Commission, Columbia Wetlands Stewardship Partners and Fairmont Trails Society. The Festival has become and annual event

Butterfly Weed

| Aquatic Plants, Butterfly, Invasive

> Showy Milkweed (Asclepias speciosa)  Photo by Larry Halverson This pretty milkweed is not listed in BC but is considered invasive. Unlike other milkweeds it can found in wetlands.   This one was photographed blooming on August 9th by the wetlands near Athalmer.  Showy milkweed is toxic. It possesses moderate concentrations of cardenolides, and can [&hellip

Fall Migration Has Begun

| birds, feeding, Migration

>  Greater Yellowlegs feeding on the shore of Lake Windermere, July 29th , 2011    Photo by Larry Halverson Greater Yellowlegs are one of the early migrants  passing through the Columbia Valley. Leaving their subarctic breeding grounds they’ll feed on small aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates, small fish, frogs, in wetlands as they move to their [&hellip

Won’t Be Seeing This Soon

| Canada Goose, Migration, Molting

> Canada Geese flying over the Columbia Wetlands May 31Photo by Larry Halverson Canada geese will soon be molting – an 8-10 week flightless period when they shed their outer wing feathers and grow new ones. Molting occurs between mid June through August. Most birds will resume flight by mid-August and with their new feathers [&hellip

Breeding Bird Atlassing Field Trip

| Bird Survey, Micro Habitats

> Red-tailed Hawk occupies a wide range of habitats and altitudesPhoto by Larry Halverson Hillary Page from the Nature Conservancy of Canada and Cam Gillies from Eagle-Eye Tours are offering an atlassing walk to the Marion Creek Benchlands above Columbia Lake.  This is an area that NCC is on the cusp of purchasing and it [&hellip

British Columbia Breeding Bird Atlas

| birds, monitoring, surveys

> Christopher Di Corrado, Atlas Coordinator recording birds in the Columbia Wetlands – Photo by Larry Halverson The British Columbia Breeding Bird Atlas (2008-12) is large-scale wildlife monitoring projects that engages over 1000 volunteers to map the distribution and abundance of breeding birds across the province. In 2011, we enter the fourth season of the atlas. [&hellip

Osprey Fishing

| Adapatations, fish, Osprey, Rainbow Trout

> Osprey with Rainbow Trout – Photo by Larry Halverson This picture was taken one evening while fly fishing. The Osprey dove, caught the fish then flew by the canoe as if to show how easy it is to catch fish. Osprey talons are specially adapted to allow one of the front toes to rotate backwards so that there are [&hellip

Wood Duck

| Osprey, Photography, Waterfowl

> The Wood Duck is one of the most colourful waterfowl – Photograph by Pat Morrow May 11, 2011 Pat Morrow didn’t have to go far to see this pair of Wood Ducks on an Osprey platform.  In fact he photographed them through a spotting scope from his home in Wilmer. Most Wood Ducks are already [&hellip

Columbia Wetlands Stewardship Partners